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Version 9 (modified by zzzzrrr, 11 years ago)
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Step 1: Compiler install

First, it's recommended you start with the the Tango variant of the dmd compiler. Linux users may also want to consider the new ldc compiler. Phobos fans can still use Blaze, although you will not be able to compile the testbed examples because of Tango dependencies.

Make sure you remember to add <install location>/dmd/bin to your system path.

Step 2: Install a build tool

Fortunately, the Windows Tango package includes an excellent tool called jake. Linux users will want to install rebuild, which is included with the dsss package. Windows users can also install dsss, although jake will work fine.

Again, if you choose to use rebuild, make sure you add <install location>/dsss/bin to your system path.

Step 3: Install Blaze

Checkout a working copy with Subversion.

For most purposes, you way want to consider creating an active working directory where you will maintain all of your libraries and projects. For example, windows users should create something like c:\workspace\ and on Linux, something like ~/workspace

Checkout the source files:

cd workspace
svn co http://svn.dsource.org/projects/blaze/trunk blaze

To update:

cd <install location>/workspace/blaze
svn up

Step 4: Compile hello world

Ok, you've made it this far without destroying your computer in frustration... Now comes the easy park!

cd workspace/blaze/examples/helloWorld

Windows w/ jake:

jake -I../../ helloWorld.d

Windows or Linux with rebuild:

rebuild -I../../ helloWorld.d

That's it! If you've make it this far as a D noob, congrats! You've already overcome the most difficult part of learning the D Programming Language: installing the compiler tools! Coding in D is a breeze....

Step 5: Compile the testbed examples

Ok, Phobos fanboys can stop here. The testbed examples have Tango dependencies and you will not be able to compile.

First, you will need to install Mercurial. Next head over to team0xf and install their excellent set of library tools.

Make sure you install everything into <install path>/workspace/xf

When finished, you should have a directory structure that looks something (Windows example) like this:

c:\workspace\blaze
c:\workspace\xf 

The testbed framework includes a number of build scripts, so they should be fairly easy to compile.

cd workspace\blaze\examples\testBed\framework

On Windows, run the included batch file to compile:

build-dmd-win.bat

On Linux, try this:

chmod a+x build-dmd.sh
./build-dmd.sh

Now sit back and wait for it to compile. If it's your first time, it may take a few minutes. Run the main binary when it's finished, and have fun!

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